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A ‘black’-sounding name makes people imagine a larger, more dangerous person, UCLA study shows

In a study exploring racial bias and how people use their mind’s-eye image of an imagined person’s size to represent someone as either threatening or high-status, UCLA researchers found that people envisioned men with stereotypically black names as bigger and more violent.

Q&A with UCLA history professor Joan Waugh on baseball in America’s Gilded Age

UCLA history professor Joan Waugh is one of the country’s pre-eminent scholars on American history in the latter half of the 19th century and in particular the Civil War. She’s also a lifelong baseball fan who during her class “United States History 1865–1900,” spends one lecture focused on how baseball became American’s national pastime.

UCLA puts issue of food waste on the front burner on Food Day 2015

A former White House chef, the host of a popular food-focused radio show and a Slow Food Los Angeles leader are gathering at UCLA on Wednesday, Oct. 21, to discuss the 1.3 billion tons of edible food that are discarded globally each year, the impact this has on communities and ways to reduce such waste.

Black Convocation speaker urges students to embrace ‘perseverance, diversity and empowerment’

UCLA alumna Christine Simmons, chief operating officer of the Los Angeles Sparks basketball team, welcomed new African-American students to UCLA at the 10th annual Black Convocation and urged them to tap into opportunities afforded by their enrollment and serve interests beyond their own.

Kelly Lytle Hernandez wins American Historical Association award

Associate professor of history Kelly Lytle Hernandez has won the 2015 Louis Knott Koontz Memorial Award from the Pacific coast branch of the American Historical Association. The award recognizes the most deserving contribution to the Pacific Historical Review, a publication of the University of California Press.

Scientists grow organic semiconductor crystals vertically for first time

Our smartphones, tablets, computers and biosensors all have improved because of the rapidly increasing efficiency of semiconductors.

Juan Felipe Herrera is a voice for the people

“I’m drawn to voices that speak for all of us,” says UCLA alumnus Juan Felipe Herrera, who was named U.S. Poet Laureate in June. To prepare for his year as the nation’s top poetry consultant — and the first Latino to hold the post — Herrera has been listening to as many people as he can.

Madame vice chancellor

Since the early 13th century, a slew of Williams, Richards, Johns and Roberts — plus a generous smattering of Georges, Jameses and Thomases — have served as vice chancellor of England’s Oxford University, the oldest university in the English-speaking world. Now comes the first woman to hold the post: Louise Richardson, who earned her master’s in political science at UCLA in 1980.

UCLA International Institute opens Center for the Study of International Migration

A new research center at UCLA will foster research and instruction on international migration. The Center for the Study of International Migration, based in the UCLA International Institute, will be led by Roger Waldinger, a UCLA distinguished professor of sociology and a well-known migration expert.

UCLA’s Bird Genoscape Project to aid conservation efforts for North American birds threatened by climate change

UCLA researchers announced today the Bird Genoscape Project, which will create the first maps identifying the population-specific migration paths of several bird species and their sub-groups to determine where conservation is needed most to combat the effects of climate change.