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Q&A: UCLA psychologist Robert Bjork on the science of learning

Robert Bjork, Distinguished Research Professor in the UCLA Department of Psychology, will share insights from his work as a renowned expert on human learning in the 120th Faculty Research Lecture, “How We Learn Versus How We Think We Learn.”

Don’t use body mass index to determine whether people are healthy, UCLA-led study says

Over the past few years, body mass index, a ratio of a person’s height and weight, has effectively become a proxy for whether a person is considered healthy. Many U.S. companies use their employees’ BMIs as a factor in determining workers’ health care costs.

Paul Terasaki, 86, transplant medicine pioneer, philanthropist, UCLA faculty member and alumnus

Paul Ichiro Terasaki, who spent three years with his family in a Japanese–American internment camp during World War II before becoming a three-time UCLA graduate, a pioneer in organ transplant medicine and a long-time supporter of the campus, died January 25. He was 86.

Dog domestication may have increased harmful genetic changes, UCLA biologists report

Domesticating dogs from gray wolves more than 15,000 years ago involved artificial selection and inbreeding, but the effects of these processes on dog genomes have been little-studied.

Is seeing believing? People are surprisingly bad at identifying where sights and sounds originate

“We tend to view our senses as flawless and think that to see is to believe,” she said. “So it’s eye-opening to learn that our perceptions are flawed.”

Cryo-electron microscope research reveals structure and mechanism of Bluetongue virus

Bluetongue disease is a viral infection that has killed approximately 2 million cattle in Europe over the past two decades. A new study has revealed the atomic structure of the Bluetongue virus, including the means by which it infects healthy host cells.

Why are some wild animals more tolerant to human interaction than others?

Over time, some species become more tolerant of humans’ presence, but the extent to which they do is largely driven by the type of environment in which the animals live and by the animal’s body size, according to a comprehensive new analysis.

UCLA puts issue of food waste on the front burner on Food Day 2015

A former White House chef, the host of a popular food-focused radio show and a Slow Food Los Angeles leader are gathering at UCLA on Wednesday, Oct. 21, to discuss the 1.3 billion tons of edible food that are discarded globally each year, the impact this has on communities and ways to reduce such waste.

Big data in biosciences and health care is focus of new UCLA research center

new research institute at UCLA may eventually provide doctors with tools to more accurately tailor medicines for individual patients, which could both improve quality of care and minimize the side effects associated with today’s medicine.

UCLA undergrads help faculty find research funding

For Martin Monti, a cognitive neuroscientist and assistant professor of psychology at UCLA, time is always in short supply, depleted by his teaching load, office hours and his research, for which he regularly sees comatose patients who’ve suffered severe brain trauma.