UCLA anthropologist knows her capuchin monkeys

For 25 years, UCLA professor of anthropology Susan Perry has been climbing, crawling, slashing and sloshing her way through the Costa Rican dry forests of Lomas Barbudal in an unprecedented study of the capuchin monkey — a small, white-faced primate that populates large areas of Central America.

UCLA alumnus Juan Felipe Herrera selected as 21st U.S. poet laureate

Juan Felipe Herrera, UCLA alumnus and recently retired UC Riverside professor whose poetry chronicled the bittersweet lives, travails and contributions of Mexican Americans, was announced today as the 21st U.S. poet laureate.

UCLA confers degrees on 7,700 new graduates

Cheers filled UCLA’s Pauley Pavilion on Friday as seniors in the Class of 2015 graduated. More than 5,500 graduates — decked out in academic regalia modified by glittery words on mortarboards, fragrant leis, novelty sunglasses and more — celebrated the completion of their degrees in person at two ceremonies hosted by the UCLA College, the university’s primary undergraduate unit. The split celebrations, at 2 p.m. and 7 p.m., each packed the famed arena to near-capacity.

Q&A: UCLA’s resident expert on Oscar Wilde proves author was not a plagiarist

Reciting the quote, “Life imitates art far more than art imitates life,” becomes second nature when one has studied the work of Oscar Wilde as long as veteran UCLA English professor Joseph Bristow. Yet it wasn’t until a 2012 National Endowment for the Arts seminar that Bristow began to reconsider why imitation, alongside artistic forgery, defines Wilde’s formative years, specifically in the case of Thomas Chatterton.

Renowned UCLA Historian awarded the inaugural Sady and Ludwig Kahn Chair in Jewish History

David N. Myers, professor and Robert N. Burr Department Chair in the UCLA College’s Department of History, has been awarded the inaugural Sady and Ludwig Kahn Chair in Jewish History, which will provide the renowned historian funds for research, graduate student support, and annual public seminars and symposia.

“It is a great honor to be the first holder of this chair, which will ensure that the poignant and powerful story of Sady and Ludwig Kahn—and of so many other Jews from the near and distant past—will be taught to generations of students at UCLA,” Myers said. “The Kahn Chair affirms UCLA’s place as a major center for the study of Jewish history in the United States and the world.”

Myers, who will be stepping down as department chair at the end of June, received his bachelor’s degree from Yale College in 1982. He then undertook graduate studies at Tel-Aviv and Harvard Universities before completing his doctorate at Columbia in 1991. He has written extensively in the fields of modern Jewish intellectual and cultural history, with a particular interest in the history of Jewish historiography.

He has authored Re-Inventing the Jewish Past: European Jewish Intellectuals and the Zionist Return to History, Resisting History: Historicism and its Discontents in German-Jewish Thought, and Between Jew and Arab: The Lost Voice of Simon Rawidowicz. Myers has edited eight books, including The Jewish Past Revisited and Enlightenment, Diaspora: The Armenian and Jewish Cases, and The Faith of Fallen Jews: Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi and the Writing of Jewish History.

The late Sady and Ludwig Kahn were among thousands of German-Jewish refugees who fled Germany in the late 1930s when the Nazis rose to power, with little more than the clothes on their backs. The Kahns forged a new life for themselves in Los Angeles, and Sady’s parents came to live with them soon after, having escaped on one of the last trains out of Germany. Sady and Ludwig worked all hours, scrimped and saved, and ultimately established a thriving hat-making business.

At Sady Kahn’s request, long-time family friends Jim and Lori Keir helped her identify beneficiary charities, one of which was UCLA. According to Keir, the university was a perfect fit with her values and interests.

“Having had no children of her own, Sady was delighted to know that young people would benefit from her trust long after she was gone,” he said.

Professor Efrain Kristal to share long-time fascination with Jorge Luis Borges

UCLA literature professor Efrain Kristal still remembers how fascinated, yet unsettled, he felt at 17 after reading his first book of short stories by the late Argentine master Jorge Louis Borges, whose philosophical fiction mixes fact and fantasy and sometimes crosses the line into literary hoax.

UCLA conservation program receives $1 million from two donors to meet Mellon Foundation’s endowment challenge

The UCLA/Getty Interdepartmental Program in Archaeological and Ethnographic Conservation has received two gifts of $500,000, successfully completing a $1 million match challenge presented by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation in 2011.

A gift from the Kahn Foundation, administered by attorney-trustee James Keir, will support the Kahn Graduate Fellows in the UCLA/Getty Conservation Program, while alumnus Jeffrey Cunard’s donation established the Lore and Gerald Cunard Chair in the UCLA/Getty Conservation Program (pending approval by the UC Office of the President).

Housed in the Cotsen Institute for Archaeology, the UCLA/Getty program trains students in cutting-edge conservation techniques to preserve priceless, fragile artifacts of archaeological, historical and artistic value. It is the only graduate-level academic conservation program on the west coast, and the only program in the country with a strong focus on archaeological and ethnographic materials.

“We are tremendously grateful for the generosity of the Mellon Foundation, Jeffrey Cunard and the Kahn Foundation,” Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost Scott Waugh said. “Their comprehensive support will enable the program to expand and continue to draw the very best graduate students to UCLA.”

The UCLA/Getty program is the youngest among a national consortium of four graduate programs in art conservation to receive challenge grants from Mellon.

Program Chair Ioanna Kakoulli, a faculty member in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, said, “Thanks to this infusion of endowed funds, we are now in a stronger position to grow the much-needed pipeline of conservation leaders with the specialist knowledge and skills to preserve artifacts and materials.”

Kakoulli noted that conservation is now considered a full-fledged scientific discipline, connecting the humanities and social sciences with the physical sciences and engineering. During their first two years, students work in state-of-the-art labs at the Getty Villa in Malibu, gaining hands-on experience with objects on loan from the Fowler Museum at UCLA, the Autry National Center, the University of Southern California and Native American assemblages. As well as technical skills, students gain an understanding of the meaning certain materials may hold for indigenous populations. The third and final year is spent interning at top-tier museums and archaeological/historical sites such as Angkor Wat in Cambodia; Buddhist sites in Sri Lanka and Bhutan; archaeological sites in Greece, Italy and Turkey; and Native American sites in California. Graduates of the program have accepted permanent positions at prestigious institutions around the country and abroad.

Alessandro Duranti, Dean of Social Sciences in the UCLA College, said, “The UCLA/Getty Program is an impressive collaboration—across disciplines, institutions, and cultures—that is helping to keep our rich world history alive while elevating the quality of research and teaching for all involved.”

David Schaberg, Dean of Humanities, said, “As one of the world’s great research universities, UCLA is committed to doing our part to preserve the legacy of humanity’s rich cultural heritage. The Mellon Foundation and these two generous donors have furthered our mission considerably.”

 

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation supports exemplary institutions of higher education and culture as they renew and provide access to an invaluable heritage of ambitious, path-breaking work. The Mellon Foundation is an important benefactor to UCLA, supporting a wide array of university initiatives.

$2.4 million grant will help UCLA to make undergrad STEM courses more interactive, more effective

new four-year, $2.4 million grant from the National Science Foundation will help UCLA redesign some undergraduate courses to make them more interactive and more interdisciplinary.

Renowned entrepreneur, UCLA alumnus Nathan Myhrvold to deliver keynote address at 2015 College Commencement

Nathan Myhrvold, an inventor, entrepreneur, author and UCLA alumnus, will be the keynote speaker for the UCLA College commencement ceremonies on Friday, June 12. He will speak at both the 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. ceremonies in Pauley Pavilion.

UCLA alumni and longtime supporters establish an endowed chair in the College’s Division of Social Sciences

Alumni Meyer Luskin ’49 and his wife, Renee ’53, and Ralph Shapiro ’53, J.D. ’58 and his wife, Shirley ’59, have jointly established the Scott Waugh Endowed Chair in the Division of Social Sciences, one of the few divisional endowed chairs in the College of Letters and Science.

The honoree, Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost Scott Waugh, said, “That four such generous and loyal alumni as the Shapiros and the Luskins have chosen to honor me in this way is truly humbling. Their gift is especially meaningful because of the commitment it demonstrates to UCLA’s academic excellence now and long into the future. Great faculty are essential to that excellence and endowed chairs help us attract and sustain the finest.”

Endowed chairs continue to play an increasingly crucial role in the recruitment and retention of outstanding university faculty. When formally approved by the University of California Office of the President, the Waugh Chair will be awarded to a social sciences faculty member who will receive funds to support his or her research and teaching activities.

“The Luskins and the Shapiros have once again demonstrated their legendary generosity and unwavering support to UCLA,” said Alessandro Duranti, Dean of the Division of Social Sciences. “Named for a generous and visionary leader on this campus, the Waugh Chair will have a far-reaching impact, providing the much needed flexibility to address faculty support in a range of areas across the Division.”

Waugh first came to UCLA as a student, graduating summa cum laude in 1970 with a bachelor’s degree in history. In 1975, after earning a Ph.D. from the University of London, he returned to UCLA to teach in the history department. He served as Dean of the Division of Social Sciences for 14 years, and was appointed Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost in 2008. He has received honors, fellowships and grants from the National Endowment for the Humanities and the American Philosophical Society. He also received the UCLA Distinguished Teaching Award, the Harvey L. Eby Award for the Art of Teaching, the UC President’s Fellowship in the Humanities, and a UCLA Faculty Development Award.

Ralph Shapiro, chair of Avondale Investment Partners, said, “Scott Waugh embodies UCLA’s commitment to excellence and service. We are delighted to be able to recognize his many years of tireless dedication to the university that gave us both a great education and a head start in our professional lives.”

Meyer Luskin president, CEO and chairman of Scope Industries, added, “It gives me enormous pleasure to join forces with Ralph in establishing this chair in honor of such a deserving individual, whose leadership has helped maintain UCLA’s place among the greatest universities in the world.”

Ralph Shapiro earned his bachelor’s degree in business administration in 1953 and his J.D. in 1958, both from UCLA. He and his wife, Shirley ’59 are the founders of the Shapiro Family Charitable Foundation. A prominent campus landmark, the Shirley and Ralph Shapiro Fountain at the top of Janss Steps was named in recognition of the couple’s longstanding commitment to the university.

Meyer Luskin credits a $30 scholarship with allowing him to continue his UCLA studies, which were interrupted by his military service in World War II. He earned a bachelor’s degree in economics in 1949, and his MBA from Stanford. Luskin and his wife, Renee ’53, have established several endowments at UCLA, one of which is the second largest gift ever received by the university. The Meyer and Renee Luskin School of Public Affairs and the Meyer and Renee Luskin Conference Center (due to open in 2016) are named in their honor.