UCLA College researcher pioneers gene therapy cure for ‘Bubble Baby’ disease

UCLA stem cell researchers have pioneered a stem cell gene therapy cure for children born with a life-threatening condition called adenosine deaminase–deficient severe combined immunodeficiency, or ADA-deficient SCID. Often called Bubble Baby disease, the condition can be fatal within the first year of life if left untreated.

Brain’s reaction to virtual reality should prompt further study, suggests new research by UCLA neuroscientists

UCLA neurophysicists have found that space-mapping neurons in the brain react differently to virtual reality than they do to real-world environments. Their findings could be significant for people who use virtual reality for gaming, military, commercial, scientific or other purposes.

UCLA astronomers solve puzzle about bizarre object at the center of our galaxy

For years, astronomers have been puzzled by a bizarre object in the center of the Milky Way that was believed to be a hydrogen gas cloud headed toward our galaxy’s enormous black hole.

‘Treasure in saliva’ may reveal deadly diseases early enough to treat them, UCLA scientists report

UCLA research could lead to a simple saliva test capable of diagnosing — at an early stage — diabetes and cancer, and perhaps neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases.

Discovery of heart’s repair process suggests potential new treatment strategy for heart attack

UCLA researchers have discovered that some scar-forming cells in the heart, known as fibroblasts, have the ability to become endothelial cells — the cells that form blood vessels. The finding could point the way toward a new strategy for treating people who have suffered a heart attack, because increasing the number of blood vessels in the heart boosts its ability to heal after injury.

UCLA Egyptologist gives new life to female pharaoh from 15th century B.C.

By the time of her death in 1458 B.C., Egypt’s Pharaoh Hatshepsut had presided over her kingdom’s most peaceful and prosperous period in generations. Yet by 25 years later, much of the evidence of her success had been erased or reassigned to her male forbears.

Homage to the ‘little fruit fly that could’

The amazing advances made in mapping the human genome don’t alter one longstanding fact: When it comes to unlocking the scientific secrets of life, fruit flies rule.

Amy Rowat cooks up science

Amy Rowat, an assistant professor at UCLA’s Department of Integrative Biology and Physiology, believes food can be a powerful way to communicate science to a broad audience.

‘Rebirth’ of Japanese studies reflected in new scholars, new directions

William Marotti couldn’t believe his good fortune when he was hired in 2006 by UCLA’s history department.

UCLA Space Scientists Find Way to Monitor Elusive Collisions in Space

Many collisions occur between asteroids and other objects in our solar system, but scientists are not always able to detect or track these impacts from Earth. The “rogue debris” created by such collisions can sometimes catch us by surprise.