Major advance in ‘synthetic biochemistry’ holds promise for industrial products and biofuels

UCLA biochemists have devised a clever way to make a variety of useful chemical compounds, which could lead to the production of biofuels and new pharmaceuticals.

Are they friends or not? Just a second of laughter can reveal relationship status, UCLA study finds

Hearing other people laugh together, even for just one second, can be enough information to gauge whether or not those people are friends, according to a UCLA study.

UCLA faculty voice: Body mass index perpetuates stigmas and indicates little about health

You’ve just returned from your morning run and you’re rustling through your snail mail when you receive some shocking news — an official memo from your employer informing you that your health insurance premium is increasing by 30 percent.

Don Nakanishi, 66, UCLA emeritus professor and pioneer in Asian American studies

Don Nakanishi, a UCLA scholar who gained national recognition for establishing Asian American studies as a viable and relevant field of scholarship, teaching, community service and public discourse, died March 21 in Los Angeles at the age of 66.

Root tale: A walking tour of the UCLA campus plants database

In 1966, when Wayne Dollase came to UCLA as an assistant professor of geology, he bought a 48-page guide to all the plants on campus, The University Garden, which had been co-authored by renowned horticulturist Mildred Mathias.

UCLA mourns the passing of Nobel laureate Lloyd Shapley, 92

Shapley was widely considered one of the fathers of game theory. His research focused on both cooperative and non-cooperative game theory, in fields including stochastic games, strategic market games, assignment games, cooperative and non-cooperative market models, voting games and power indices, potential games, cost allocation and organization theory.

From wrongfully jailed to artist, activist and UCLA professor

A new professor in UCLA’s African-American Studies department is rallying with students and faculty around increasingly visible injustices in the U.S. criminal justice system. It’s a topic near and dear to Bryonn Bain’s heart.

UCLA sociologist approaches modern Iran from ‘best of both worlds’

Perhaps Kevan Harris’ greatest good fortune was to arrive in Iran as a sociologist with no preconceptions about its culture or values. An Iranian American, Harris grew up in Kentucky and then Chicago, where he earned a B.A. in economics and political science at Northwestern University.

Antarctica could be headed for major meltdown

In the early Miocene Epoch, temperatures were 10 degrees warmer and ocean levels were 50 feet higher — well above the ground level of modern-day New York, Tokyo and Berlin. It was more than 16 million years ago, so times were different.

Uphill battle for California’s native plant species

Invasive species have moved faster than native species, colonizing and competing in new territories. But endemic species — those unique to California — have largely stayed put. Endemics currently occupy spaces where they can successfully compete against invasive species and other disturbances – but climate change could prove too challenging.