Why are some wild animals more tolerant to human interaction than others?

Over time, some species become more tolerant of humans’ presence, but the extent to which they do is largely driven by the type of environment in which the animals live and by the animal’s body size, according to a comprehensive new analysis.

Q&A with Ryan Harrigan on West Nile virus, silent killer of songbirds

Remember West Nile virus? While it makes headlines every few years for causing a flurry of deaths in people, the virus has also meant significant declines in the survival of some of the most common North American songbird species, according to a new study coauthored by Ryan Harrigan of UCLA’s Institute of the Environment and Sustainability (IoES).

Creative writing at UCLA: not just for English majors anymore

Starting in Fall 2016, non-English majors will for the first time be able to enroll in a creative writing course — specifically a general education introductory class — currently under construction and to be taught by UCLA professor and acclaimed novelist Mona Simpson, and newly hired head of creative writing, Fred D’Aguiar.

A ‘black’-sounding name makes people imagine a larger, more dangerous person, UCLA study shows

In a study exploring racial bias and how people use their mind’s-eye image of an imagined person’s size to represent someone as either threatening or high-status, UCLA researchers found that people envisioned men with stereotypically black names as bigger and more violent.

Q&A with UCLA history professor Joan Waugh on baseball in America’s Gilded Age

UCLA history professor Joan Waugh is one of the country’s pre-eminent scholars on American history in the latter half of the 19th century and in particular the Civil War. She’s also a lifelong baseball fan who during her class “United States History 1865–1900,” spends one lecture focused on how baseball became American’s national pastime.

Kelly Lytle Hernandez wins American Historical Association award

Associate professor of history Kelly Lytle Hernandez has won the 2015 Louis Knott Koontz Memorial Award from the Pacific coast branch of the American Historical Association. The award recognizes the most deserving contribution to the Pacific Historical Review, a publication of the University of California Press.

Scientists grow organic semiconductor crystals vertically for first time

Our smartphones, tablets, computers and biosensors all have improved because of the rapidly increasing efficiency of semiconductors.

UCLA’s Bird Genoscape Project to aid conservation efforts for North American birds threatened by climate change

UCLA researchers announced today the Bird Genoscape Project, which will create the first maps identifying the population-specific migration paths of several bird species and their sub-groups to determine where conservation is needed most to combat the effects of climate change.

Center shatters myth of ‘quiet’ Japanese Americans imprisoned in camps

With help from elderly survivors of the World War II internment camps, the UCLA Asian American Studies Center has launched the Suyama Project to gather and make available online evidence of resistance among Japanese Americans who were forcibly removed from their homes and sent to camps by the federal government, shattering the myth of the “quiet Americans” who silently accepted their fate without question.

Measuring the sound of angels singing

UCLA professor Sharon Gerstel studies how Byzantine-era churches enhanced the performance of liturgical chants.